AP

Trump Insists He’s Not Dropping Citizenship Question Effort

Jul 3, 2019, 10:39 AM | Updated: Jun 8, 2022, 5:04 pm
Protesters gather outside the U.S. Supreme Court April 23, 2019 in Washington, DC. The case highlights a question about U.S. citizenship included by the Trump administration in the proposed 2020 U.S. census. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
(Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump insisted Wednesday that he is not dropping efforts to include a citizenship question on the upcoming 2020 census, even as the U.S. Census Bureau has started the process of printing the questionnaire without it.

“News Reports about the Department of Commerce dropping its quest to put the Citizenship Question on the Census is incorrect or, to state it differently, FAKE!” Trump said in a tweet. “We are absolutely moving forward.”

The White House did not immediately respond to questions about what he meant.

Trump’s tweet directly contradicted comments made less than 24 hours earlier by Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross and Justice Department lawyers that they were standing down, following a Supreme Court decision halting the question.

“The Census Bureau has started the process of printing the decennial questionnaires without the question,” Ross said in a statement Tuesday. “My focus, and that of the Bureau and the entire Department is to conduct a complete and accurate census.”

Justice Department lawyers also notified parties in lawsuits challenging the question, and at least one federal judge who blocked its inclusion, that the company with a $114 million contract to print census questionnaires had been instructed to start printing forms without the citizenship question.

In the short term, Trump’s comment is unlikely to affect work on the census.

But U.S. District Judge George Hazel has ordered Justice Department lawyers to file a written stipulation with him by Monday that the government is no longer seeking to put the question on the 2020 census, Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund lawyer Denise Hulett said. Hulett participated in a conference call Tuesday with the judge and lawyers for both sides in the census citizenship case.

Hazel is one of three judges who refused to allow the administration to ask everyone about their citizenship status in next year’s census. The other judges are in New York and California.

Hazel is considering reopening the case after the civil rights groups who filed the Maryland lawsuit produced evidence from the computer files of a Republican redistricting consultant who died last year that they shows that discrimination against Hispanics was behind the push for the citizenship question. It’s unclear whether Trump’s comment would affect Hazel’s decision.

Opponents of the citizenship question said it would discourage participation by immigrants and people who are in the country illegally, resulting in inaccurate figures for a count that determines the distribution of some $675 billion in federal spending and how many congressional districts each state gets.

The administration had said the question was being added to aid in enforcement of the Voting Rights Act, which protects minority voters’ access to the ballot box. But in the Supreme Court’s decision last week, Chief Justice John Roberts joined the court’s four more liberal members in saying the administration’s current justification for the question “seems to have been contrived.”

For months, the administration had argued that the courts needed to decide quickly whether the citizenship question could be added because of the deadline to starting printing materials this week.

On Twitter Tuesday night, Trump wrote that the Supreme Court ruling marked a “very sad time for America.” He also said he had asked the Commerce and Justice departments “to do whatever is necessary to bring this most vital of questions, and this very important case, to a successful conclusion.” He did not elaborate.

Even though the Census Bureau is relying on most respondents to answer the questionnaire by internet next year, hundreds of millions of printed postcards and letters will be sent out next March reminding residents about the census, and those who don’t respond digitally will be mailed paper questionnaires.

___

Associated Press writer Michael Schneider in Orlando, Florida, contributed to this report.

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Trump Insists He’s Not Dropping Citizenship Question Effort