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UDOT Begins Final Push To Make Bangerter Highway More Like A Freeway

(Chopper 5/ KSL TV)

SALT LAKE CITY — The Utah Department of Transportation has started environmental studies as part of an $805 million project to remove stoplights from Bangerter Highway, making it more like a freeway.

“The studies will evaluate environmental impacts associated with potential improvements such as new interchanges or frontage roads and will ultimately identify a preferred design at each location that minimizes impacts while still meeting the transportation needs of the region as well as local communities,” UDOT officials said.

The studies will be completed over the next two years at the following locations along Bangerter Highway:

  1. 13400 South in Riverton
  2. 9800 South in South Jordan
  3. 4700 South in Taylorsville/West Valley City
  4. 4100 South in West Valley City
  5. 4100 South to S.R. 201 in West Valley City/Salt Lake City
  6. California Avenue in Salt Lake City
  7. 2700 West in Bluffdale/Riverton

“Our priority is to improve safety and mobility along this critical corridor,” UDOT project manager Brian Allen said. “When the interchanges are complete and traffic can flow freely without stoplights, we expect to see a significant reduction in crashes and in drive times, both on Bangerter Highway and east and west on cross streets.”

UDOT estimates drivers will shave up to 20 minutes off a trip from Draper to the Salt Lake City International Airport once the project is completed.

Construction is slated to begin in 2023 at 13400 South, 4700 South and 9800 South intersections, and work at 4100 South, California Avenue and between 4100 South and state Route 201 is scheduled to start in 2028.

The Utah Legislature has already approved $805 million for the improvements. Additional funding will need to be approved for work at 2700 West.

Public open houses are scheduled beginning next week for the 13400 South, 4700 South and 9800 South studies:

According to UDOT, Bangerter Highway moves an average of 60,000 vehicles per day, and that number is expected to double by 2040 with continued growth on the west side of the Salt Lake Valley.

Without these major improvements, delays would increase by four times over the next 25 years, officials said.

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