CORONAVIRUS

NYC braces for fewer cops, more trash as vax deadline looms

Oct 29, 2021, 8:08 AM
People march across the Brooklyn Bridge to protest the Covid-19 vaccine mandate for municipal worke...
People march across the Brooklyn Bridge to protest the Covid-19 vaccine mandate for municipal workers on October 25, 2021 in New York City. All city workers, excluding uniformed correction officers, are required to have at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine by 5pm on October 29th. (Photo by David Dee Delgado/Getty Images)
(Photo by David Dee Delgado/Getty Images)

NEW YORK (AP) — Mounting trash. Closed firehouses. Fewer police and ambulances on the street.

That’s the possibility New York City is bracing for come Monday as a COVID-19 vaccine mandate looms and thousands of municipal workers remain unwilling to get the shots.

Police officers, firefighters, garbage collectors and most other city workers face a 5 p.m. Friday deadline to show proof they’ve gotten at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine.

Workers who don’t comply will be put on unpaid leave starting Monday.

Mayor Bill de Blasio held firm on the mandate as firefighters rallied Thursday outside his official residence, sanitation workers appeared to be skipping garbage pick ups in protest and the city’s largest police union went to an appeals court seeking a halt to the vaccine requirement.

Pat Lynch, president of the Police Benevolent Association, said the hard deadline “sets the city up for a real crisis.” Andrew Ansbro, president of the Uniformed Firefighters Association, warned longer response times will “be a death sentence to some people.”

De Blasio said Thursday that the city has contingencies to maintain adequate staffing and public safety, including mandatory overtime and extra shifts — tools that he said were typically used “in times of challenging crisis.”

The mayor called the sanitation slowdowns “unacceptable” and said that department will move to 12-hour and Sunday shifts to ensure trash doesn’t pile up.

“My job is to keep people safe — my employees, and 8.8 million people,” De Blasio said at a virtual news briefing. “And until we defeat COVID, people are not safe. If we don’t stop COVID, New Yorkers will die.”

People who refuse to get vaccinated are now a big factor in the continued spread of the virus. Backers of mandates say New Yorkers have a right not to be infected by public servants unwilling to get the shots.

Nearly one-quarter of city employees covered by the impending mandate have yet to receive at least one vaccine dose as of Thursday, including 26% of police personnel, 29% of firefighters and EMS workers and 33% of sanitation workers, according to city data. City jail guards have another month to comply.

The fire department said it was prepared to close up to 20% of its fire companies and have 20% fewer ambulances in service while changing schedules, canceling vacations and turning to outside EMS providers to make up for expected staffing shortages.

Ansbro said up to 40% of firehouses could have to close.

“The department must manage the unfortunate fact that a portion of our workforce has refused to comply with a vaccine mandate for all city employees,” Fire Commissioner Daniel Nigro said.

Police Commissioner Dermot Shea, who had COVID-19 in January, said his department was sending reminders to workers whose records indicated they hadn’t yet received a shot and that NYPD vaccination sites will remain open all weekend.

More than 700 officers were vaccinated on Thursday alone, the NYPD said, rushing to meet the deadline for the mandate and an extra incentive: workers who get a shot by Friday at a city-run vaccination site will get $500.

“On Monday, when this thing really starts being enforced, we’re going to check the vaccination status and if you’re not vaccinated, no pay and you’re going to be not able to work,” Shea said in a video message Wednesday to officers. “I don’t think anyone wants that to happen. I don’t think you want it to happen. I certainly don’t. We need you out there.”

Fire department officials are holding virtual meetings with staff, explaining the mandate and imploring them to get vaccinated.

A Staten Island judge on Wednesday refused a police union’s request for a temporary restraining order on the mandate, but she ordered city officials into her courtroom next month to explain why the requirement shouldn’t be reversed. If the mandate is deemed illegal, workers put on leave will be given back pay, the city said.

Mike Salsedo, 44, was among hundreds of firefighters protesting Thursday outside de Blasio’s residence, Gracie Mansion. He said he believes he has natural immunity to COVID-19 after having the disease last year and doesn’t need to be vaccinated, a stance that’s contrary to the consensus among public health experts.

“I’m a man of faith, and I don’t believe that putting something manmade into my body is good,” Salsedo said.

Another firefighter, Jackie-Michelle Martinez, said the ability to choose was “our God-given right” as she questioned the city’s decision to move away from its previous policy, which allowed workers to stay on the job if they had a negative COVID-19 test.

“If the weekly testing is working, why are you, Mayor de Blasio, eliminating it?” she asked.

COVID-19 is the leading cause of death of law enforcement officers in the U.S., killing 498 officers since the start of 2020 compared to 102 gun deaths, according to the Officer Down Memorial Page, which tracks police fatalities.

De Blasio on Thursday credited the impending deadline for moving the needle on vaccinations across city government. In the last week, the number of affected workers who’ve gotten at least one dose rose from 71% to 76%.

When the state required all workers at hospitals and nursing homes to get vaccinated, a last minute rush of people to comply meant that few facilities experienced staffing challenges.

“We expected that a lot of the vaccinations would happen toward the end of the deadline,” de Blasio said. “We also know a lot of people make the decision once they really realize that they’re not going to get paid. That’s just the human reality.”

___

On Twitter, follow Michael Sisak at twitter.com/mikesisak, Michelle L. Price at twitter.com/michellelprice and Karen Matthews at twitter.com/1karenmatthews

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NYC braces for fewer cops, more trash as vax deadline looms